Highest Paying Jobs

Highest Paying Jobs

Post covid, health care related jobs continue to constitute the highest-paying jobs in the United States, based on the latest job ranking research from U.S. News & World Report, they continue to be among the highest paying jobs.

Specifically, anesthesiologists are the highest paid workers in America with an average salary of $267,020 per year, according the Bureau of Labor Statistics as compiled by US News. Next, surgeons and oral surgeons round out the top three jobs with the highest earning potential with jobs in healthcare take the top 10 spots overall.

Clearly, health care jobs require high-cost post-secondary and/or graduate level educations. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, four years of medical school typically cost the Class of 2019 $250,000 at an average public universities and an astounding $330,180 at an average private university. But for those who complete the program and graduate, it can definitely pay off. After 2020, doctors were more likely than any other profession to be in the top 1% of earners, according to a Brookings Institution report.

In all, more than half of the high paying jobs on the following list — fourteen of them — require a doctorate degree, and all but one are within the field of medicine. Attorneys, which U.S. News categorizes in the social services industry, typically earn salaries averaging $144,230 per year.

Nine of the top high-paying jobs, require solely a bachelor’s degree.

The highest-paying job that requires only a four-year undergraduate degree is that of a petroleum engineer, earning an annual average of $156,370. Petroleum engineers typically work in offices and visit drilling sites to help develop methods for extracting oil and gas from deposits underground. While the job of a petroleum engineer is often considered to be the highest-paying college major, a job in this high paying field can be difficult, stressful and highly time-intensive.

The job of airline pilot made a debut on the high-paying list in 2020 with an average earning of $146,660 per year. Some commercial airlines hire pilots who hold a bachelor’s degree, although a college education is not necessarily required. Pilots also undergo training to attain a commercial pilot’s license and Airline Transport Pilot certification from the Federal Aviation Administration. Moreover, job candidates also generally go through psychological and aptitude tests with commercial airlines to assess their critical thinking and decision-making under pressure.

Other top-paying jobs that generally require just a four-year degree include roles in computers, engineering, IT, sales, marketing and general business.

Here, then, are the top 25 highest-paying jobs as of 2021 according to US News & World Report:

25. Political scientist
Mean salary: $115,300 per year

Industry: Social services

Education needed: Master’s degree

24. Actuary
Mean salary: $116,250 per year

Industry: Business

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

23. Optometrist
Mean salary: $119,980 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

22. Financial advisor
Mean salary: $121,770 per year

Industry: Business

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

21. Pharmacist
Mean salary: $123,670 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

20. Business operations manager
Mean salary: $123,880 per year

Industry: Business

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

19. Sales manager
Mean salary: $140,320 per year

Industry: Sales and marketing

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

18. Lawyer
Mean salary: $144,230 per year

Industry: Social services

Education needed: Doctorate degree

17. Pilot
Mean salary: $146,660 per year

Industry: Social services

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

16. Financial manager
Mean salary: $146,830 per year

Industry: Business

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

15. Marketing manager
Mean salary: $147,240 per year

Industry: Sales and marketing

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

14. Podiatrist
Mean salary: $148,220 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

13. IT manager
Mean salary: $152,860 per year

Industry: Technology

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

12. Petroleum engineer
Mean salary: $156,370 per year

Industry: Engineering

Education needed: Bachelor’s degree

11. Nurse anesthetist
Mean salary: $174,790 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Master’s degree
As of January 1, 2025, all U.S. nurse anesthesia programs must award a doctoral degree as a prerequisite for entry into nurse anesthesia practice.

10. Dentist
Mean salary: $175,840 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

9. Pediatrician
Mean salary: $183,240 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

8. Prosthodontist
Mean salary: $191,400 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

7. Physician
Mean salary: $196,490 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

6. Psychiatrist
Mean salary: $220,380 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

5. Orthodontist
Mean salary: $225,760 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

4. Obstetrician and gynecologist
Mean salary: $238,320 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

3. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons
Mean salary: $242,370 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

2. Surgeon
Mean salary: $255,110 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

1. Anesthesiologist
Mean salary: $267,020 per year

Industry: Health care

Education needed: Doctorate degree

Back to Home

 

Welcome to Occupations.Com, where our job is to help you get you one. Fast.

This aggregator job board is not associated with any other private, public, for-profit, non-profit, academic or governmental entity. Use of our free job board is entirely at your own risk. While we take pride in delivering the highest quality job leads possible, we remind you to be vigilant if ever asked to disclose personal information including banking details, pin codes, 2-factor authentications, social security numbers, credit card information, passwords and other confidential data.

Make sure any details you voluntarily disclose are pertinent, relevant and genuinely needed. NEVER pay an upfront fee for an interview, processing fee, equipment, parking pass or a background search. NEVER agree to meet in a non-public or possibly-unsafe place. ALWAYS make sure you have thoroughly researched the company with which you are dealing, the legitimacy of any web or physical addresses provided, the background and character of the interviewer as well as the overall reputation of the company.

  • As the on-demand economy has grown, it has become common for businesses to rely on freelance talent to complement their full-time staff and address fluctuating business needs. Yet, as more and more companies consider how on-demand workers might fit into their broader 
  • About two-thirds of all companies will outsource some part of their recruiting process. There are all kinds of reasons that these companies might outsource the recruitment process, but there's no wrong answer. RPO recruitment providers are here to help you focus ...
  • When recruiting talent, do you check out candidates' social footprints? According to a survey by The Manifest, 90% of employers do. You can learn a lot about applicants by checking out their LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram accounts. But always remember that the reverse is true: They can also learn a lot about your company. And what they ...
  • With layoffs impacting the start of 2023, many companies are still planning for a coming recession and battling high inflation. But what does this mean for your 2023 recruiting efforts? Evan Sohn, CEO of Recruiter.com, hosted a webinar with Bianca Sitzer, Global Strategic Partnerships at Deel; Lisa Simon, Senior ...
  • Despite rising employment, the well-documented global talent shortage continues to worsen, with one-third of companies reporting difficulty hiring for roles and over half of U.S. employers reporting recruitment difficulty. As many of you may be aware, there is no shortage of candidates, but there is a shortage of appropriately qualified candidates. Organizations are overcoming this problem by recruiting overseas candidates to work locally or within their ...
  • Some LinkedIn research suggests that the 2023 recession won't stop job seekers from quitting and finding new jobs.  While many companies might want to implement hiring freezes and wait to see what happens in the job market, there are still many candidates in the job market. As a result, companies that ...
  • Your nonprofit depends on people to move its mission forward. Most often, nonprofits think and speak about these people as supporters, volunteers, and sponsors. But you must pay attention to the importance of your internal team. Your employees are working behind the scenes to keep your nonprofit operating and driving impact for your beneficiaries.  However, some nonprofits, especially smaller organizations working with limited resources, need help building and maintaining effective internal teams. This ...
  • Recruiting is vital for any organization but can also be time-consuming and costly. As a result, outsourcing recruitment, also known as Recruitment Process Outsourcing (RPO), is becoming an increasingly popular solution for companies looking to streamline their recruitment process and access a wider talent pool.  In this article, we will explore the benefits of recruiting outsourcing, how it is changing the recruitment industry, and what companies should consider when outsourcing their recruitment process. From the ...
  • Using AI in recruitment is nothing new. Recruiter.com has used AI recruiting software that helps recruiters source candidates for challenging positions. However, with the popularity of ChatGPT, recruiters are now wondering if they could use this tool for their recruiting process. Some are worried that it will take their jobs. But as with past AI tools, it likely won't replace many jobs. So instead of looking at it as a replacement, you ...
  • There are currently 275,000 members of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). This means that there are a lot of HR professionals out there, but which ones are the best? These several thousand people all have to wear multiple hats: they must be adept at employee relations and employee development, ...
SOC Code
Privacy Policy
Terms Of Service
Skip to content